Argentina

The adoption of new clinical practice patterns by medical care providers is often challenging, even when the patterns are believed to be efficacious and profitable. This paper uses a randomized field experiment to examine the effects of temporary financial incentives paid to medical care clinics for the initiation of prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Verification in results-based financing (RBF) mechanisms is one of the key differentiators between it and related health financing structures such as social health insurance. Verifying that providers have achieved reported performance in RBF mechanisms is considered a crucial part of program implementation and key to maintaining trust through transparency, as well as the viability of the mechanism. Verification is however a process which has thus far been little studied.

In Argentina, Plan Nacer, which in Spanish translates to “Birth Plan,” has improved access to maternal and child health care to the country’s poorest populations. Plan Nacer targets two million uninsured pregnant women and children (up to six), who are typically poor, relative to the general population.

Plan Sumar Program (supported by the Bank with a US$400m. investment project) was rolled out on October 17 and builds on 7 years of results-based financing experience from a maternal and child health initiative, Plan Nacer. Plan Nacer is a targeted public health insurance program eligible for uninsured women who were pregnant or had recently given birth (up to 45 days post-delivery), and children under 6 years of age.

For new mothers, the health and wellbeing of their newborns and themselves is a priority. Thanks to Plan Nacer, Argentina’s health coverage program for pregnant women and children under six years, mothers can be confident in coverage that allows them to receive quality care when they need it—and the rigorous results are here to prove it. 

Argentina's Plan Nacer provides insurance for maternal and child health care to uninsured families. The program allocates funding to provinces based on enrollment of beneficiaries and adds performance incentives based on indicators of the use and quality of maternal and child health care services and health outcomes. The provinces use these resources to pay health facilities to provide maternal and child health care services to beneficiaries. This paper analyzes the impact of Plan Nacer on birth outcomes.

While the number of maternal and child deaths almost halved between 1990 and 2013, progress on neonatal mortality has noticeably lagged behind.
Consider this:

 Argentina's Plan Nacer provides insurance for maternal and child health care to uninsured families. The program allocates funding to provinces based on enrollment of beneficiaries and adds performance incentives based on indicators of the use and quality of maternal and child health care services and health outcomes. The provinces use these resources to pay health facilities to provide maternal and child health care services to beneficiaries. This paper analyzes the impact of Plan Nacer on birth outcomes.

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During the early 2000s, Argentina’s total expenditures on health, as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), placed it among the top-20 countries in the world in per capita health spending. For example, Argentina spent 8.9 percent of GDP in 2000 and 10.1 percent in 2006. Although the reforms improved access to healthcare for those employed in the formal sectors, the poor continued to be excluded from the health insurance system and had worse than average health indicators.

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